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“Within just one generation we can have every child in school and learning”

Amel Karboul of the Education Commission gives a fascinating TED Talk about how to change the world by investing in education.


How do you get every child around the world into school? And how do you ensure that they’re actually learning the skills they need?

That’s the topic explored by Amel Karboul in a fascinating new TED Talk released today. She’s a former Tunisian government minister who now sits on the global Education Commission – a group of world leaders and experts whose Learning Generation report delivered potential answers to those questions above.

Developing countries are being urged to spend 20% of their national budgets on education to help all of their children fulfil their potential.

In her talk, Karboul says: “I’m the product of a bold leadership decision. After 1956 when Tunisia became independent, the country’s first president, Habib Bourguiba, decided to invest 20% of the country’s national budget in education.” 

Watch Amel Karboul’s TED Talk

“President Bourghiba helped establish free, high-quality education for every boy and every girl. And together with millions of other Tunisians, I’m deeply indebted to that historic decision.”

Karboul says the Education Commission realised it needed to shift the world’s attention from simply schooling to learning.

She adds: “We found out what the top 25% fastest education improvers in education do. 

“And what we found out is that if every country moves at the same rate as the fastest improvers within their own income level, then within just one generation we can have every child in school and learning. 

Karboul also discusses the lack of qualified teachers and the concept of dividing them into “content” and “tutoring” teachers.

She highlights how crucial financing is in delivering quality education for all. That includes the innovative International Finance Facility for Education, which will unlock $10 billion of additional funding each year by 2020.