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“Each child counts and each child can learn – irrespective of their disabilities, mental health or environment”

Children Making Pictures At Luth Childrens Cancer Department In Nigeria
Making pictures at the children's cancer department of Lagos University Teaching Hospital (Facebook / The Autism Awareness Place, https://www.facebook.com/theautismawarenessplace/)

Barriers to education, Children with disabilities, Discrimination of marginalised children, Global Youth Ambassadors, Right to education, Teachers and learning

One of our Global Youth Ambassadors from Nigeria tells about her work with children who have disabilities or illness, or who live in orphanages or correctional homes. 


My vision is that “each child counts and each child can learn” – irrespective of their disabilities, mental health or their tribe and environment.

This mentality made me start my NGOs The Autism Awareness Place, which targets children with disabilities, and The Chosen One Foundation where we reach out to children with health challenges like cancer, those who are physically challenged and children at orphanages or correctional homes. 

This mission came to me because of the difficulty of access to school education for neurotypical children (children without disability).

Gya Olowo Omotoke With Children At Modupe Cole Home For Disabled Children In Nigeria

Olowo Omotoke visits Modupe Cole, a home for children with disabilities (Facebook / The Autism Awareness Place, https://www.facebook.com/theautismawarenessplace/)

How much more difficult is it for children with disabilities, who need a lot of infrastructure, resources and skills training?

My mission is that school education can be taken to children on their sick bed and anywhere they are – distance is not a barrier. 

We have so far reached out to children who are physically challenged at Modupe Cole, children with cancer at LUTH (Lagos University Teaching Hospital), children with autism in mainstream schools and correctional homes for boys at Oregun. 

Some of our challenges are lack of adequate resources such as volunteers, funds, lack of adequate knowledge on special needs and lots of stigmatisation that the children face daily. 



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